Dutch school replaces Easter tradition with celebration of Islamic Sugar Holiday
Voice of Europe | Wednesday, November 7, 2018 -- 9:13 PM EST
***Uploaded by CitizensDawn and Last updated on Wednesday, November 14, 2018 -- 12:17 PM EST***
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One day the world will look back and wonder, "how did it come to this." Look to the Jim Acosta's of the 'News' purveyors.

***Article first published by 'Voice of Europe' on Oct. 16, 2018***

The Theo Thijssen school in Amsterdam decided to replace the traditional Easter breakfast with the celebration during the Islamic Sugar Holiday, newspaper De Telegraaf reports.

According to the school “it wants to give more attention to traditions of other cultures”.

A letter from the school came into the hands of Dutch news outlets Geenstijl and Powned. The letter says that several day care volunteers will help during this year’s Islamic Sugar Holiday.

During the celebration of the Islamic holiday, the children in class will be told what the feast is and why it is being celebrated. “This way we hope to celebrate a different holiday with the children,” the letter says.

The development at the Amsterdam school fits within a framework that parts of the city are Islamising quickly or in mainstream media terms: Making room for diversity.

In August this year it became clear how an Amsterdam mosque harboured radicalised Muslims who wanted to join Isis.

Another eye opener is that a Muslim majority party is the largest in the ‘Nieuw West’ part of the city. Their leader even told Dutch people to leave their country if they don’t like diversity.

The party sometimes defends Turkish President Erdogan’s policies and refused to recognise the Armenian genocide as well.

How parts of Amsterdam Islamised in a few decades becomes clear in an article written by a highly educated inhabitant who had to move from a suburb.

“The house I was living in overlooked a school playground. Around 2005, I first noticed young girls of around 6 years of age being garbed in totally black, full-body covering dresses, including black head scarves.

Nearly all the mothers, with a few exceptions, wore headscarves and dark full-body covering dresses. It truly looked like a scene from Iran or Pakistan. But it certainly was no longer the same Dutch neighbourhood as when I had moved in”, he said in his article.

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